The Blog To End All Blogs

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Tuesday, January 03, 2006

Nobody Reading? Hanging In There Through A Blog's Deadzone

I have been writing The Blog To End All Blogs for five days now. I have written sixteen quality posts on a multitude of topics, although they are almost all focused on business and blogging in some way, shape, or form. I have signed up for every free program, service, and directory I can find in the hopes of getting somebody, anybody, to read my blog regularly. Yes, quite a few times in the last day or two I have thought about how long it is going to take to build an established readership at this rate.

But I have not despaired or given up. And, if you are in the same situation as me, neither should you.

The following are the techniques that I use to keep myself enthused and encouraged about my blog:

- I remind myself that almost no blog is successful in five days.

It is a cliche to say that Rome was not built in a day or that anything worth having is worth working for. However, it's also true. Darren and Yaro did not have 1000 readers in five days. Yet now, they are two of the most respected figures in the world of blogging. You knew coming in that readers would not be beating down your door in a week. So why stop what you're doing because your results are what you expected them to be?

- I reason that when I begin to accrue regular readers, they will appreciate all of the posts I made in the beginning.

I, for one, am new to the blogging game. When I found Problogger, Entrepreneur's Journey, and Performancing I didn't just read the articles that they posted from then on out. I went back through their archives and read every snippet of useful information I could find. I know that when I have devoted readers they will be interested in going back and seeing my earlier articles. I don't want to disappoint them, and you will not want to disappoint your readers either.

- I realize that my posts have an intrinsic value as an expression of myself; they aren't just "bait" to lure in readers.

The first three or four days that I was posting I posted in the hopes that someone would see the post and link it or blog about it. Yesterday and today, though, I've realized that no one will want to read my posts if they do not obviously have some meaning to me and some originality. The entire reason that I (and you) began blogging was to express myself, and to share my ideas, opinions, and expertise with interested readers. There is no purpose in having a forum to offer my mind to other people if I am not giving them content that is actually representative of my mind and personality. If you don't write in a way that has meaning to yourself you'll put up the keyboard within a few days.

- I take solace in the small victories that occur, rather than dwelling on the negatives.

Optimism is often overused, but so is pessimism. Today after looking at my blog I could have dwelled on the fact that I only had seventy page views, most of which did not result in anyone reading my articles. Instead, I rejoiced at receiving my first ever comment. Obviously my content had interested someone enough to get them to take the time to tell me. Believe me, if you look at your blog's successes you'll be sporting a smile, and if you focus on your blog's shortcomings you'll be wearing a frown.

Optimism, individualism, perseverance, and patience will combine to nurse you through your blog's infancy. When you've got a few hundred people reading your blog everyday, you'll be shocked that you ever even considered quitting. The difference between the successful bloggers and the poor bloggers isn't apparent in times of prosperity. The way you react to the slow times will determine your success in blogging.